Three Good Reasons

1. A Living Wage is Good for business

There is growing evidence that businesses benefit from implementing the Living Wage: “75% of employees reported an increase in the quality of their work after receiving the Living Wage.” “80% of employers noticed an increase in productivity.”  KPMG is one of the largest professional services companies in the world and one of the Big Four auditors, along with Deloitte, EY and PwC. Its global headquarters is located in Amsterdam, the Netherlands.  Guy Stallard is Head of Facilities at KPMG. Facilities at KPMG consists of three specialist functions supporting 11,000 partners and staff – Property, Workplace Services and Business Continuity, Safety and Security. Guy heads up these teams, managing 22 offices.

“For KPMG, paying the Living Wage is not just an important part of our values, our people strategy and our award winning corporate responsibility agenda: it’s critical.!” Guy Stallard

2. A Living Wage is Good for employees and their families

Research has found workplaces have better psychological wellbeing than those in ‘non-living wage’ workplaces.  The same research found that two-thirds of the workers interviewed in Living Wage workplaces reported improvements in either their work, family life or finances. Those receiving the Living Wage can afford a decent quality of life. For some this means working fewer hours and having time to see their families, time to volunteer in their communities, or time to look after their health.

3. A Living Wage is Good for society

Employees earning the Living Wage are more likely to spend, to save, and to have greater faith in the economy.

References:
[1] http://www.ilo.org/gateway/faces/home/polareas/minwage?locale=EN&countryCode=ZAF&track=null&policyId=5&_adf.ctrl-state=gw9imtslt_84

[2] http://www.labour.gov.za/DOL/legislation/acts/basic-guides/basic-guide-to-working-hours

[3] http://www.ilo.org/gateway/faces/home/ctryHome?locale=EN&countryCode=ZAF&_adf.ctrl-state=gw9imtslt_55

[4] http://www.dailymaverick.co.za/article/2015-08-26-groundup-south-africas-5-million-working-poor/#.VeRK4_l2Bnj

[5] Read more: http://www.southafrica.info/about/social/poverty-040414.htm#.VeRfk_l2Bng#ixzz3kOxacXyd

[6] http://www.lrs.org.za/docs/BI2014-lowres_Chapt1.pdf

[7] If one took a house of 55m2 costing around R250,000, the minimum recommended as a more acceptable standard for South Africa’s social and cultural needs by the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (1982), hen a housing based living wage would equate to +_R8,000 per month.

[8] http://www.numbeo.com/food-prices/country_result.jsp?country=South+Africa (assuming 31 days per month)1,811.30 R Milk (regular), (0.25 liter)3.00 R; Loaf of Fresh White Bread (150.00 g)3.33; Rice (white), (0.10 kg)1.68; Eggs (3.60)6.29; Local Cheese (0.10 kg)7.89; Chicken Breasts (Boneless, Skinless), (0.25 kg)14.47; Apples (0.35 kg)6.19; Oranges (0.35 kg)5.39; Tomato (0.25 kg)4.03; Potato (0.30 kg)3.93; Lettuce (0.20 head)2.22